The Microeconomics of Somali Piracy 

By Brandon Scott

Originally Written in 2010

Crime Pays, and piracy pays very well these days. Piracy is by far not a new issue.  In the first few years of the 19th century the United States had to send Marines to the shores of Tripoli to combat an enduring piracy problem. However, the last few years the world has been seeing a drastic increase in piracy off the East African coast. In increase to such an extent it has brought global adversaries together to combat the threat. Since 2007, the number of successful pirate attacks has increased nearly fourfold. There were a total of 293 pirate attacks worldwide in 2008, of which 38% occurred within the Gulf of Aden or off the coast of Somalia (Leader). Read More

I3: Integrated International Intervention – The Future of Stability & Security Operations Using Yemen & Somalia as Success Models

By Brandon Scott

Written in 2014

The 21st Century has shown that the Core; connected countries that are predominantly stable and progressive with regards to security, governance & development are affected by what happens in the Non-Integrating Gap (or just Gap); countries that are disconnected, unstable, and not progressive with governance, security & development.[i][ii] Historically the transaction has been unidirectional, though with this evolution the Core was forced to change their methods of engagement with Gap regions. This evolution in foreign affairs is the new paradigm for engagement. Reviewing Yemen and Somalia as extreme examples will provide evidence of the new paradigm and its successes. Read More

How Piracy Saved Somalia: The Unintended Positive Consequences of Somalia Piracy

By Brandon Scott

Piracy off the coast of Somalia splashed onto the global stage in 2009 at near epidemic levels. The impact of Somali piracy affected the entire global community as shipping costs soared costing the global community as much as $18 Billion.[i] The wave of piracy attacks however was short lived due to a quick and comprehensive response by the international community to counter piracy and its causes. The world’s response to Somalia continues today and is a reversal of 20 years of alienation prior; that made possible Somalia’s de-evolution into a failed state that the world ignored and feared simultaneously. The success countering the three-year piracy epidemic however shadows the success of piracy for Somalia by demanding attention and assistance for a withering nation – in effect: piracy saved Somalia. Read More

OSINTSUM 19JAN2015

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Bagram, Afghanistan

 

OSINTSUM 13JAN2016

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Kabul, Afghanistan